Happy Days

Happy DaysRead this and then watched the Broadway Theatre Archive production featuring Irene Worth. One of the most depressing works I have ever had the opportunity to encounter. There is much debate as to the meaning of the playhere is my interpretation: by 'grounding' ourselves into a 'happy' existence we are actually subordinating our essence...and that will ultimately destroy who we really were becoming. "I have measured out my life with coffee spoons" is the way most of us will pass from our existence...most of us will not even "...rage against the dying of the light" because our light died long before we didmetaphysical zombies. No more talk of Mr. Beckett until after Christmas...(something tells me Mr. Beckett would have LOVED to be the top elf for Krampus!) Happy Days Les Jours Heureux Srie TVAlloCin Happy Days Les Jours Heureux Est Une Srie TV De Garry Marshall Avec Ron Howard Richie , Ron Howard Richard J Richie Cunningham Retrouvez Tous Les Happy Days TV Series IMDb Created By Garry Marshall With Ron Howard, Henry Winkler, Marion Ross, Tom Bosley The Cunningham Family Live Through The S With Help And Guidance From The Lovable And Almost Superhuman Greaser, Fonzie Happy Days Lyon Happy Days Lyonrue Paul Et Marc BarbezatDcines Charpieu Tlphoneinfo Happy Days Lyon Mentions Lgales Conditions Gnrales De Vente CookiesHappy Days WikipediaHappyDays Happy Days Rception HAPPY DAYS RECEPTION, La Location De Votre Matriel De Rception Sur Bordeaux Et Sur Toute La Rgion Nouvelle Aquitaine Depuis Plus Deans, HAPPY DAYS RECEPTION Propose Ses Clients Professionnels, Particuliers Et Institutionnels Du Matriel Tendance, De Qualit Et Un Tarif Abordable Paroles Oh Happy Day Aretha Franklin Oh, Oh, Oh, Oh, Oh, Oh It Was What A Happy Day Oh Happy Day Est Une Chanson Interprte Par Aretha Franklin Cette Chanson Fait Partie De L Album One Paroles Et Traduction St Francis Choir Oh Happy DayAnd To Live And Live Rejoicing , Come On Everybody Et Comment Vivre En Apprciant , Allez Tout Le Monde Every Day, Everyday Sing It Like You Mean It Chaque Jour, Chaque Jour Chante Le Comme Tu Le Sens Oh Happy Day Oh, Happy Day Oh Happy Day Oh Jour Heureux Oh Jour Heureux Oh Jour Heureux I M Talking About The Happy Days Oh Happy Day Je Parle Des Jours Heureux Oh Jour HeureuxHappy Days Auto Moto Ecole Doussard Happy Days Formations Auto Moto Cole ZA Des VernaysDoussard TlMobileauto Ecole Happydayske Agrment N E Words fail, there are times when even they fail. However, speaking is Winnie's raison d'être, words keep flowing from her without conveying any meaning, just to fill the silence and the void.

Early on, it struck me as upsetting the fact that Winnie was trying so hard to convince herself that it is a happy day, the wanting to get out of the mound and the simultaneous attachment to it.

Never have I ever come across a play whose directorial instructions are as important as the play itself. I quickly became engrossed in reading Beckett's directions and it felt as if I was watching it on scene.
I found it an exceptional avantgarde piece of art. At the start of Happy Days, we see Winniea plump, fiftyyearold housewife of a woman – buried to her waist in the centre of a mound of earth. The sun blazes down in the form of a powerful spotlight. A barren landscape stretches into the distance. Beside Minnie on the mound are a large bag and a parasol. Throughout the play, she removes items from the bag, including a Browning automatic revolver (‘Brownie’) and a toothbrush. Halfway through the first of two short acts the parasol bursts into flames from the unrelenting heat. At the start of the play she seems to be alone, but soon we see that there is a man (Willie) on the far side of the mound, reading a newspaper, though we see only the back of his head for the whole of the first act. He only crawls over the mound to face Winnie in a dramatic and moving scene at the end of the play, when she is buried to her neck in the mound. Winnie does most of the talking, addressing many of her comments to Willie, and he responds only occasionally and briefly. When she seems to be nodding off at times she is brought awake again by an unseen bell.

At a first reading this play, like all of Beckett’s plays, leaves you with a vague sense of depression and incomprehension, though you do also feel a sense of achievement in having got through it from beginning to end and of having read something worthwhile. Subsequent readings throw up all sorts of allusions and echoes that completely escaped you the first time, and if you then (and only then) read a guide to the play you recognise it for the masterpiece it is: a highlypolished jewel, a starkly concentrated appraisal of the human condition packed into two short acts, that lesser writers would and do take volumes to laboriously spell out. Despite seeming a rambling, knockedoffintenminutes affair, it is in fact a highly sophisticated interplay of repetition and variation with leitmotifs, silence and precise movements that are all indicated in the meticulous stage directions, and is almost operatic in its effect.

Beckett is never patronising, he leaves you (perhaps somewhat dismissively) to work out for yourself what it is all about. Scratch the surface and you will find allusions to Zeno, Shakespeare, Aristotle, the Anglican Liturgy and Holy Communion and Dante, as well as The Merry Widow. You may see it, with A. Alvarez, as ‘a sour view of a cosy marriage’, or agree with The Times that ‘the text is an elaborate structure of internal harmonies with recurring clichés twisted into bitter truths, and key phrases chiming ironically through the development as in a passacaglia’. For me, it is all of these things, but perhaps most of all it is a comment on ageing, loneliness and loss. It will haunt all who see it or read it.
description

“If you don't know where you are currently standing, you're dead.”

Happy days! LOL!
I like this play. I consider myself a big fan of the absurd theatre – it represents life as it is.

description

Winnie and her husband Willie, represented most people nowadays – sinking in their daily routines without having any purpose.

Reading the dialogue between them was a pleasure for me, I enjoyed it. I think it was simple and meaningful. I think Happy Days is more beautiful than Beckett’s most famous play Waiting for Godot. I liked it more.

Wow... this left me all depressed and disillusioned about life, death and everything in between!


What I like is that the play begins with a surreal and bizarre situation and this doesn't clear up. This kind of makes you imagine all kinds of reasons why and how the woman and her husband are stuck there and living like that. There is so much in this play that makes it worth to read or see!

Winnie seems swallowed by the earth, can't walk first and in act two can't move anything but her head, and still is full of positive talk. Showing how people no matter what go on with life and talk hopeful and positivesaying how enjoyable things are when you can't imagine how they endure it all. Winnie is still trying to look good and talks about happy days that will still occur. But doing and saying this all in such a fake manner as if trying to convince herself in believing the make believe (crap) she utters. She is stuck with her husband who seems apathetic in his ways and pays little attention to her. He too seems stuck to her, but why?, just because once he had proposed and she said yes. Making marriage a shameful reason to stay with someone. And even if Winnie knows her husbands needs peace, she calls him all the time wanting a reaction of some kind because that is what she needs.
Also the every day routine: brushing teeth, combing, make up etc is made so meaningless and empty. The way that Winnie does these routine activities makes it even more horrible as she seems to do it to pass time, get through the day and to avoid feeling the void/loneliness/emptiness of existence/her handicapin other words the reality. She even forgets if she did or did not comb, what does it matter?
Both husband and wife pining away waiting for their own and each others death, sometimes long for it and sometime fearing it.
What also was interesting to me was when Winnie was saying how absurd it was that she had to wake at the sound of a bell and sleep at the sound of the bell. And why not wake or sleep when she felt like it? Still she continued to do so.
And oh the loneliness! how the couple doesn't really communicate, and is so isolated and seems lonely, still there is sometimes the comfort of another person, however there are occasions that you think they wouldn't mind getting rid of the other. At the end of the play I thought Willie would shoot Winnie, himself or both of them. But not doing so made it much stronger as it showed how awful and miserable the situation, people mostly endure and just wait until life is over by itself. Also you kind of feel there is no point to their lives.

Even concerns about the environment and the future of the earth are addressed: Winnie says "do you think there is no atmosphere?", the post apocalyptic scenery, them living in a hole/cave and the fact that it is always light so you know when to wake/sleep if you hear a bell??? To me these bizarre elements made it not only surrealistic but maybe a leap in the future, as if it were a science fiction. Then again maybe it was only meant as: why not question the houses we live in or the day/night rhythm we have just because we think we do it "right and according to how it is meant". Why do we think things are meant a way? For what purpose? What does it all lead to anyway?

What I found interesting was that I read that some people thought the play ended optimistic.. I really did not feel that way and would find it interesting to hear why some people thought this way. WINNIE What would you say, Willie, speaking of your hair, them or it? (Pause.) The hair on your head, I mean. (Pause. Turning a little further) The hair on your head, Willie, what would you say speaking of the hair on your head, them or it?
Long pause.
WILLIE It.
WINNIE (turning back front, front). Oh you are going to talk to me today, this is going to be a happy day! (Pause. Joy off.) Another happy day. The reason for a one star rating, presented without comment:
no pain (looks for toothbrush)
hardly any (takes up toothbrush)great
thng that (examines handle of brush)
nothg like it (examines handle, reads)
pure .. . what?(pause)what? (lays
down brush)ah yes (turns towards bag)
poor Wilie (rumages in bag)no zest
(rummages)for anythig(brings out
spectacles in case)no interest(turs back
front) in lie (takes spectacles from case)
poor dear Wilie (lays down case)sleep
for ever( opens spectacles)marvellous gift
(puts on spectacles)nothig to touch it­
(looks for toothbrush)in my opinion
(takes up toothbrush)always said so­
(examines handle of brush)wish I had it
(examines handle, reads)genuie . . .
pure . . . what? (lays down brush)blnd
next (takes off spectacles)ah well (lays
down spectacles)seen enough (feels in
bodice for handkerchief)I suppose (takes
out folded handkerchief)by now (shakes
out handkerchief)what are those wonderful
lines (wipes one eye)woe woe is me­
(wipes the other)to see what I see (looks
for spectacles)ah yes(takes up spectacles)
wouldn't ms it(starts polishing
spectacles, breathing on lenses)or would I ?
(polishes)holy light(polishes)bob
up out of dark(polishes)blaze of hellsh
light. This is a solemn comedy, Winnie and Willie are mostly buried in sand. From the moment Winnie wakes she does not stop talking, Willie contributes very little and spends most of his time not facing Winnie or listening to her. Ultimately, Winnie is alone with very little to do but keeps cheerful, as the play unfolds this cheeriness has a bitter sour to it.

I came across this play when it was first televised, it was part of the Beckett on Film project. The staging is dynamic but the drama comes from Winnie’s chatty nature and her struggle to fill the void of the endless hours by distracting herself with memories and staying busy with daily routines to feels tragic. More so, when she is alert to every new thing Willie does and voices pleasures. Where the moment passes as quickly as it comes highlighting the fragility of her happiness.

Reading this was harder than watching it. It’s a wonderful play but it took me a while to get my bearings as the dialogue is constantly broken up with (sometimes very prescriptive) direction. However, reading this made me see clearer the struggle Winnie has to keep feeling alive, a challenge as she is stuck and cannot dig herself out (and accepts that Willie can do nothing to help her either). Regardless, she soldiers on, determined to stay positive, but her predicament makes her happiness sobering.

An extract from Act One:

WINNIE:
… Willie, speaking of your hair, them or it? (Pause.) The hair on your head, I mean. (Pause. Turning a little further.) The hair on your head, Willie, what would you say speaking of the hair on your head, them or it?

Long pause.

WILLIE:
It.

WINNIE:
(turning back front, joyful) Oh you are going to talk to me today, this is going to be a happy day! (Pause. Joy off.) Another happy day.
(Pause.)

Aside from the two characters, nothing is wasted in this play, every object and prop are also advocating to who Winnie is. I’ve read a tiny bit about Existentialism and Theatre of the Absurd in relation to Samuel Beckett, but I liked how the play’s quirkiness allowed me to enjoy and grasp a big philosophical idea without making me feel I had to understand it thoroughly. Another great play. Another happy day.

Samuel Barclay Beckett was an Irish avant-garde novelist, playwright, theatre director, and poet, who lived in France for most of his adult life. He wrote in both English and French. His work offers a bleak, tragicomic outlook on human nature, often coupled with black comedy and gallows humour.

Beckett is widely regarded as among the most influential writers of the 20th century. Strongly influenced

[Reading] ➹ Happy Days Author Samuel Beckett – Salbutamol-ventolin-online.info

    Early on, it struck me as upsetting the fact that Winnie was trying so hard to convince herself that it is a happy day, the wanting to get out of the mound and the simultaneous attachment to it.

    Never have I ever come across a play whose directorial instructions are as important as the play itself. I quickly became engrossed in reading Beckett's directions and it felt as if I was watching it on scene.
    I found it an exceptional avantgarde piece of art. At the start of Happy Days, we see Winniea plump, fiftyyearold housewife of a woman – buried to her waist in the centre of a mound of earth. The sun blazes down in the form of a powerful spotlight. A barren landscape stretches into the distance. Beside Minnie on the mound are a large bag and a parasol. Throughout the play, she removes items from the bag, including a Browning automatic revolver (‘Brownie’) and a toothbrush. Halfway through the first of two short acts the parasol bursts into flames from the unrelenting heat. At the start of the play she seems to be alone, but soon we see that there is a man (Willie) on the far side of the mound, reading a newspaper, though we see only the back of his head for the whole of the first act. He only crawls over the mound to face Winnie in a dramatic and moving scene at the end of the play, when she is buried to her neck in the mound. Winnie does most of the talking, addressing many of her comments to Willie, and he responds only occasionally and briefly. When she seems to be nodding off at times she is brought awake again by an unseen bell.

    At a first reading this play, like all of Beckett’s plays, leaves you with a vague sense of depression and incomprehension, though you do also feel a sense of achievement in having got through it from beginning to end and of having read something worthwhile. Subsequent readings throw up all sorts of allusions and echoes that completely escaped you the first time, and if you then (and only then) read a guide to the play you recognise it for the masterpiece it is: a highlypolished jewel, a starkly concentrated appraisal of the human condition packed into two short acts, that lesser writers would and do take volumes to laboriously spell out. Despite seeming a rambling, knockedoffintenminutes affair, it is in fact a highly sophisticated interplay of repetition and variation with leitmotifs, silence and precise movements that are all indicated in the meticulous stage directions, and is almost operatic in its effect.

    Beckett is never patronising, he leaves you (perhaps somewhat dismissively) to work out for yourself what it is all about. Scratch the surface and you will find allusions to Zeno, Shakespeare, Aristotle, the Anglican Liturgy and Holy Communion and Dante, as well as The Merry Widow. You may see it, with A. Alvarez, as ‘a sour view of a cosy marriage’, or agree with The Times that ‘the text is an elaborate structure of internal harmonies with recurring clichés twisted into bitter truths, and key phrases chiming ironically through the development as in a passacaglia’. For me, it is all of these things, but perhaps most of all it is a comment on ageing, loneliness and loss. It will haunt all who see it or read it.
    description

    “If you don't know where you are currently standing, you're dead.”

    Happy days! LOL!
    I like this play. I consider myself a big fan of the absurd theatre – it represents life as it is.

    description

    Winnie and her husband Willie, represented most people nowadays – sinking in their daily routines without having any purpose.

    Reading the dialogue between them was a pleasure for me, I enjoyed it. I think it was simple and meaningful. I think Happy Days is more beautiful than Beckett’s most famous play Waiting for Godot. I liked it more.

    Wow... this left me all depressed and disillusioned about life, death and everything in between!


    What I like is that the play begins with a surreal and bizarre situation and this doesn't clear up. This kind of makes you imagine all kinds of reasons why and how the woman and her husband are stuck there and living like that. There is so much in this play that makes it worth to read or see!

    Winnie seems swallowed by the earth, can't walk first and in act two can't move anything but her head, and still is full of positive talk. Showing how people no matter what go on with life and talk hopeful and positivesaying how enjoyable things are when you can't imagine how they endure it all. Winnie is still trying to look good and talks about happy days that will still occur. But doing and saying this all in such a fake manner as if trying to convince herself in believing the make believe (crap) she utters. She is stuck with her husband who seems apathetic in his ways and pays little attention to her. He too seems stuck to her, but why?, just because once he had proposed and she said yes. Making marriage a shameful reason to stay with someone. And even if Winnie knows her husbands needs peace, she calls him all the time wanting a reaction of some kind because that is what she needs.
    Also the every day routine: brushing teeth, combing, make up etc is made so meaningless and empty. The way that Winnie does these routine activities makes it even more horrible as she seems to do it to pass time, get through the day and to avoid feeling the void/loneliness/emptiness of existence/her handicapin other words the reality. She even forgets if she did or did not comb, what does it matter?
    Both husband and wife pining away waiting for their own and each others death, sometimes long for it and sometime fearing it.
    What also was interesting to me was when Winnie was saying how absurd it was that she had to wake at the sound of a bell and sleep at the sound of the bell. And why not wake or sleep when she felt like it? Still she continued to do so.
    And oh the loneliness! how the couple doesn't really communicate, and is so isolated and seems lonely, still there is sometimes the comfort of another person, however there are occasions that you think they wouldn't mind getting rid of the other. At the end of the play I thought Willie would shoot Winnie, himself or both of them. But not doing so made it much stronger as it showed how awful and miserable the situation, people mostly endure and just wait until life is over by itself. Also you kind of feel there is no point to their lives.

    Even concerns about the environment and the future of the earth are addressed: Winnie says "do you think there is no atmosphere?", the post apocalyptic scenery, them living in a hole/cave and the fact that it is always light so you know when to wake/sleep if you hear a bell??? To me these bizarre elements made it not only surrealistic but maybe a leap in the future, as if it were a science fiction. Then again maybe it was only meant as: why not question the houses we live in or the day/night rhythm we have just because we think we do it "right and according to how it is meant". Why do we think things are meant a way? For what purpose? What does it all lead to anyway?

    What I found interesting was that I read that some people thought the play ended optimistic.. I really did not feel that way and would find it interesting to hear why some people thought this way. WINNIE What would you say, Willie, speaking of your hair, them or it? (Pause.) The hair on your head, I mean. (Pause. Turning a little further) The hair on your head, Willie, what would you say speaking of the hair on your head, them or it?
    Long pause.
    WILLIE It.
    WINNIE (turning back front, front). Oh you are going to talk to me today, this is going to be a happy day! (Pause. Joy off.) Another happy day. The reason for a one star rating, presented without comment:
    no pain (looks for toothbrush)
    hardly any (takes up toothbrush)great
    thng that (examines handle of brush)
    nothg like it (examines handle, reads)
    pure .. . what?(pause)what? (lays
    down brush)ah yes (turns towards bag)
    poor Wilie (rumages in bag)no zest
    (rummages)for anythig(brings out
    spectacles in case)no interest(turs back
    front) in lie (takes spectacles from case)
    poor dear Wilie (lays down case)sleep
    for ever( opens spectacles)marvellous gift
    (puts on spectacles)nothig to touch it­
    (looks for toothbrush)in my opinion
    (takes up toothbrush)always said so­
    (examines handle of brush)wish I had it
    (examines handle, reads)genuie . . .
    pure . . . what? (lays down brush)blnd
    next (takes off spectacles)ah well (lays
    down spectacles)seen enough (feels in
    bodice for handkerchief)I suppose (takes
    out folded handkerchief)by now (shakes
    out handkerchief)what are those wonderful
    lines (wipes one eye)woe woe is me­
    (wipes the other)to see what I see (looks
    for spectacles)ah yes(takes up spectacles)
    wouldn't ms it(starts polishing
    spectacles, breathing on lenses)or would I ?
    (polishes)holy light(polishes)bob
    up out of dark(polishes)blaze of hellsh
    light. This is a solemn comedy, Winnie and Willie are mostly buried in sand. From the moment Winnie wakes she does not stop talking, Willie contributes very little and spends most of his time not facing Winnie or listening to her. Ultimately, Winnie is alone with very little to do but keeps cheerful, as the play unfolds this cheeriness has a bitter sour to it.

    I came across this play when it was first televised, it was part of the Beckett on Film project. The staging is dynamic but the drama comes from Winnie’s chatty nature and her struggle to fill the void of the endless hours by distracting herself with memories and staying busy with daily routines to feels tragic. More so, when she is alert to every new thing Willie does and voices pleasures. Where the moment passes as quickly as it comes highlighting the fragility of her happiness.

    Reading this was harder than watching it. It’s a wonderful play but it took me a while to get my bearings as the dialogue is constantly broken up with (sometimes very prescriptive) direction. However, reading this made me see clearer the struggle Winnie has to keep feeling alive, a challenge as she is stuck and cannot dig herself out (and accepts that Willie can do nothing to help her either). Regardless, she soldiers on, determined to stay positive, but her predicament makes her happiness sobering.

    An extract from Act One:
    WINNIE:
    … Willie, speaking of your hair, them or it? (Pause.) The hair on your head, I mean. (Pause. Turning a little further.) The hair on your head, Willie, what would you say speaking of the hair on your head, them or it?

    Long pause.

    WILLIE:
    It.

    WINNIE:
    (turning back front, joyful) Oh you are going to talk to me today, this is going to be a happy day! (Pause. Joy off.) Another happy day.
    (Pause.)

    Aside from the two characters, nothing is wasted in this play, every object and prop are also advocating to who Winnie is. I’ve read a tiny bit about Existentialism and Theatre of the Absurd in relation to Samuel Beckett, but I liked how the play’s quirkiness allowed me to enjoy and grasp a big philosophical idea without making me feel I had to understand it thoroughly. Another great play. Another happy day."/>
  • Paperback
  • 48 pages
  • Happy Days
  • Samuel Beckett
  • English
  • 08 March 2018
  • 9780571066537

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