Sobre héroes y tumbas

Sobre héroes y tumbas Popular Books, Sobre Héroes Y Tumbas Author Ernesto Sabato This Is Very Good And Becomes The Main Topic To Read, The Readers Are Very Takjup And Always Take Inspiration From The Contents Of The Book Sobre Héroes Y Tumbas, Essay By Ernesto Sabato. Is Now On Our Website And You Can Download It By Register What Are You Waiting For? Please Read And Make A Refission For You

Ernesto Sabato nació en Rojas, provincia de Buenos Aires, en 1911, hizo su doctorado en física y cursos de filosofía en la Universidad de La Plata, trabajó en radiaciones atómicas en el Laboratorio Curie, en Francia, y abandonó definitivamente la ciencia en 1945 para dedicarse exclusivamente a la literatura. Ha escrito varios libros de ensayo sobre el hombre en la crisis de nuestro tiempo y sobre

[PDF / Epub] ✅ Sobre héroes y tumbas Author Ernesto Sabato – Salbutamol-ventolin-online.info
  • Paperback
  • 547 pages
  • Sobre héroes y tumbas
  • Ernesto Sabato
  • Spanish
  • 02 January 2019
  • 9789500716055

10 thoughts on “Sobre héroes y tumbas

  1. says:

    Sobre Héroes y Tumbas = On Heroes and Tombs, 1981, Ernesto Sábato

    On Heroes and Tombs is a novel by Argentine writer Ernesto Sabato (1911–2011), first published in Buenos Aires in 1961, and translated by Helen R. Lane in 1981.

    Nineteen-year-old Martin Castillo is a boy from Buenos Aires trying to find his path in life. He meets and falls in love with Alejandra Vidal Olmos who with her father Fernando represents the "old", post-colonial and autochthonous Argentina, which is seen mutating amid a strange and unsettling "new" world.

    تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیست و پنجم ماه آوریل سال 2006 میلادی

    عنوان: قهرمانان و گورها؛ ارنستو ساباتا؛ مترجم: مصطفی مفیدی؛ تهران، نیلوفر، 1384؛ در 599ص؛ شابک: 9644482689؛ موضوع داستانهای نویسندگان آرژانتینی - سده 20م

    مترجم درباره رمان قهرمانان و گورها می‌نویسند: «باز هم قصه انسان است، که تضادهایش از هم دریده‌ اند؛ قصه انسان است، قصه مهربانی و پاکدلی است که بی‌رحمی‌ها و ترفندهایش مسخ می‌کنند؛ باز هم قصه انسان است: اسیر سرنوشت، محکوم جبر واقعیت‌های سرسخت گریزناپذیر، که از خود اختیاری ندارد؛ نمی‌توان او را محکوم کرد، نمی‌توان بر او حکم کرد؛ نمی‌توان در او داوری کرد، بل باید بر او رحمت آورد و گریست»؛ پایان نقل از مترجم

    داستان «قهرمانان و گورها»، داستان «آله‌ خاندرا»، دختر زیبایی از یک خاندان ممتاز آرژانتینی، و سه مردی است، که زندگی‌شان به نحو غمباری با زندگی او، گره خورده است؛ نخست پدرش، «فرناندو بیدال»، که مشغله ی ذهنی غریبی نسبت به شرارت و تبهکاری، و بیش از همه نسبت به «آله‌ خاندرا» دارد؛ پس از او «مارتین»، عاشق جوان‌تر او، که رستگاری خویش را به بهای دست شستن از عشق خود به دست می‌آورد؛ سپس «برونو» است، یک فیلسوف و نویسنده، و دوست خانوادگی «آله‌ خاندرا»، که عشق به مادر را، در رابطه‌ اش با دختر او، یعنی «آله‌ خاندرا»، می‌جوید

    تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 09/04/1399هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  2. says:

    "I can feel the passage
    of time, as thought it were
    coursing through my
    veins, along with my blood"


    It's not often I turn to google maps whilst reading a book. In the case of Ernesto Sabato's 1961 novel I found it helpful but not essential. The first third of the novel there didn't seem to be a moment without the mention of a specific area within the city, add to that an abundance of street names, landmarks and buildings, which initially bothered me. Because the city in question and the setting for Sabato's unsettling masterpiece is Buenos Aires, a place (apart from being in Argentina) I knew absolutely nothing about. It wasn't my intention to turn the city inside out, upside down and learn every street corner off by heart, but just to get a rough idea of the city's layout (especially the area around the port).

    On finishing 'On Heroes and Tombs' one of the most important things to mention is just how dark it was, and not just it's chilling tone. It felt the whole city sat under a blanket of perpetual black skies, two of the three main characters suffered with great inner turmoil and suicidal madness, most of the novel takes place in the late evenings or the dead of night, there are dark rooms, hallways, and tunnels existing in an almost Kafkaesque like subterranean world, and to top it all off the Blind are obsessed over. There is doomed love, a crazed family, terrorism, political unrest and eventually murder. If Sabato's seminal short novel 'El Túnel' (1948) owed a debt to French existentialists, this mighty beast feels more like a love letter to Buenos Aires . But a letter covered in tears, sickness and blood. Even poor old Jorge Luis Borges gets a cameo appearance, wondering down the street on a stick.

    The novel predominantly follows two narratives and various sub-plots, the opening starts with young star-crossed lovers Martín and Alejandra Vidal Olmos, who meet by chance near a monument. Martín is just an ordinary man trying to find his way in the city, he loves her more than she loves him, but Alejandra does have some serious issues, she is, to put it bluntly, insane.
    She takes him to the house of her family one night, where things turn eerie and creepy for the reader, building a slow sense of dread. There is a crazy uncle who plays a musical instrument, and an elderly woman who has been living upstairs for decades without ever leaving the room, with only a mummified head for company. Once Martín gets over the shock he doesn't really care, just wanting to be with her. Martín is as sincere as he is bewildered in his amorous aspirations towards Alejandra, he seems a heartbroken sweetheart. Whereas she is needy, demanding and cruel towards him. On seeing her with another man he wants to know who 'Fernando' is (believing it's her lover, when he is actually her father). The moment he mentions this name the relationship is heading in the direction of emotional disaster and psychological carnage, thus leading to an act of madness. All this is the past, looked back on by Martín and Bruno (Bruno being a writer who knew Alejandra's family, and had feelings for her mother.

    The narrative then switches to Alejandra's father, Fernando Vidal, a quite morbid man, who has a ludicrous and damn right terrifying obsession with the Blind (as a youngster he poked the eyes out of a sparrow and watched as it flew around the room in great pain and fear), he believes Blind people are part of some sort of secret sect, he watches them, follows them, and is the creator of the bizarre 'Report on the Blind'. Fueled by paranoia and intrigue he ends up in an old apartment building after seeing two individuals leave (thinking they are part of the sect). He enters...

    The next 30-40 pages were filled with what can only be described as an hallucinogenic, claustrophobic, nerve shredding, heart-stopping fear. It felt like a cross between Alfred Hitchcock under psychosis and Dante's Inferno, Sabato used such wild and inventive imagery I just couldn't believe my eyes, and simply couldn't put the book down!. In fact for long spells I couldn't put it down. Around this point (about half-way through) it was THAT GOOD!.

    Everything I have mentioned above only happens on the surface, the novel goes deeper than that, making it exceptional to read. It could be seen simply as a chilling love story, or tale of madness. But more than anything it's just as much a philosophical wonder on history. The novel expands on landowning baronies and industrial development, civil war, and social and economical problems. There are moments included that many non-Argentinians may fail to fully understand.
    I don't want to give the impression that 'On Heroes and Tombs' is a tedious allegorical book on Argentinian history. Other sub-plots do exist, but they are only important if you choose them to be, they can stay in the background if one pleases.

    There is a certain type of fictional narrative whereby the writer endeavors to free himself of an obsession that is not clear, even to himself. This appears to be the only sort Sabato could write.
    The novel was like entering a dark labyrinth of insanity, going on a guided tour, before being thrown back into our world. A stunningly powerful and haunting piece of work.

  3. says:

    On Heroes and Tombs is a story of the great young blinding love and it is a story of the great love mystery.
    And there is a great dark story within the love story: Report on the Blind.

    • God does not exist.
    • God exists and is a bastard.
    • God exists, but falls asleep from time to time: his nightmares are our existence.
    • God exists, but has fits of madness: these fits are our existence.

    That is the hypothetical nature of our existence according to the gospel of the blind.
    Reading it I thought of Jorge Luis Borges who, despite being blind, could see much further than the others.
    On Heroes and Tombs is the book of the Conscious and the Unconscious… And it is a painstaking exposition on the subject of human existence:
    Sometimes they are relatively young men, individuals thirty or forty years old. And – a curious thing, worth pondering – the younger they are the more pathetic and helpless they seem. For what can be more frightful than the sight of a youngster sitting brooding on a bench in a public square, overwhelmed by his thoughts, silent and estranged from the world round about him? Sometimes the man or the youngster is a sailor; at other times he is perhaps an emigré who would like to return to his country and is unable to; many times they are beings who have been abandoned by the woman they love; others, beings who are out of step with life, or who have left home forever, or are brooding about their loneliness and their future. Or it may be a youngster like Martín himself, who is beginning to realize, to his horror, that the absolute does not exist.

    The novel reads as though Ernesto Sabato is slowly opening a door into the great unknown.
    “There are things known and there are things unknown, and in between are the doors…”

  4. says:

    An Argentine story in the labyrinthine tradition of the author’s countryman, Borges. Sabato is one more of an entire boatload of Latin American authors who fled their countries for exile in Europe or the US during periods of military dictatorship. When he returned to Argentina (he died at 100 in 2011) Sabato burned all his work except for three novels, saying that he did not want to be remembered for mediocre work.

    The last descendants of an old oligarchical family of Buenos Aires reside in a decaying mansion now in the midst of a factory and warehouse district. So the family and the house are disintegrating. The house is occupied by a spinster aunt who hasn’t been out of the attic in half a century, a mentally challenged nephew who constantly plays the flute, and a 90-year old who is still reliving the wars of the 1800’s. And did I mention a mummified, severed head of one of the ancestors? What’s that little keepsake worth on Antiques Roadshow?

    A young man, still in his teens, runs into the one quasi-functioning person who lives in the house; a young woman who is an epileptic, a drug addict (laudanum in those days), and an alcoholic. And did I mention bi-polar? Obviously this young man never saw the movie “Fatal Attraction.” “The world is filth… and I’m garbage…” she tells him. How does that work for you as a pick-up line? You can’t say she didn’t warn him.

    Another crazy paranoid character, the young woman’s father, does not live in the house but writes a Stephen Kingish treatise, contained in the book, about how “The Blind” have a secret conspiracy to control the world. I wonder if Sabato means this as a metaphor for the types of slanders that were said of Jews during WW II? “See that blind man across the street? I told you they were following us.”

    This is a long, dense book, almost 500 pages, sparse dialog, and occasional paragraphs that run more than a couple of pages. Tied up in the story is a lot of local color of Buenos Aires in the 1950’s and 1960’s and a search for the “Argentine national character,” if we believe in such things anymore. Through stories from the old man and others, we hear about the wars of Argentina’s independence from Spain, the quasi-civil wars between liberals and conservatives fought over the years that the echo the Spanish Civil War and that continue to plague Latin American nations even today. We hear of the Communist and anarchists movements of the 1950’s and the military dictatorships.

    We are treated to deep thoughts: “…we hope for great happiness, some enormous, total happiness. And as we wait for this phenomenon to take place we let the little happinesses, the only real ones, pass us by…” For Argentina, a nation of immigrants: “In the end that had proved to be the real America for the immense majority: poverty and tears, humiliation and pain, homesickness and nostalgia.” On our masks: “…we are never the same person for different conversational partners, friends or lovers…” It fascinates me as a geographer, to see again as in some other Latin American stories, the motif that “our family tree is written on the street names of the capital.” It’s a poem by Borges and it’s in Spilt Milk by Chico Baraque (a Brazilian book) as well. All in all, a heavy-duty read, but worth it.

  5. says:

    It is not clear to me why Sabato did not get Nobel Prize for literature. This book is the masterpiece. The plot is quite strange and it enabled Sabato to tell profound things about the world and human nature in general. On Heroes and Tombs defenetly goes to my favorite shelf.

  6. says:

    Well...I have a mixed feeling about this book.

    The first half of the book, consisting in two parts - The Dragon and the Princess and Invisible Faces - was one of the most intense reading I had so far and I was thinking that this is worthy of a 5 stars rating.
    But after that it's like you're reading a completely different book, wich can be a good thing, nonetheless, but I was captivated by the story between Martin and Alejandra and wanted to know more of that, thus I was a bit dissapointed by the second half of the book. It's interesting, but nothing compared with the first half, to me atleast.

    Overall, a great book.

  7. says:

    Decent review fromm 1981:
    http://www.nytimes.com/1981/07/26/boo...

    The point in that review that I disagree with most strongly is the idea that Sábato isn't funny. The third section of the book, "Report on the Blind," is dark, twisted, and totally paranoid, but it's also a playful usage of an unreliable narrator. It's funny like parts of Lolita are, although the author's literary intentions and overall sincerity-level could not be more different.

    Like Aira (me thinks this to be a common trait to good Argentine novelists) Sábato switches mid-page from fiction to personal essay, and unlike Aira, he manages to do that without breaking voice from his characters.

    This is not exactly a feminist tract; the dead woman at the book's center, while painted as strong-willed and bright, exists as a kind of whorish and hyper-objectified metaphor or prism to refract the experiences of the other main characters. At the same time, the book is about how men parse the memories of women they've once loved; the immature objectification can on some level be seen as having been by design.

    {This might be too modern a lens for a book that's 50 years old, but it is a book that is so close to perfect, that articulates so much that is universal, that you would do it a disservice not to comment.}

    As much as this book reflects the author's biases, experience, and states of mind, it also aims to record and parse the overall character of 1960s Buenos Aires. As one of the darkest and most beautiful passages from the apocalyptic and maddened "Report on the Blind" reads, in Helen Lane's translation:

    "...the closer I came to the towers, the greater their majesty and mystery became. There were twenty-one of them, laid out in a polygon whose perimeter must have been comparable in size to that of Buenos Aires. The stone that they were built of was black, basalt perhaps, and hence they stood out in solemn grandeur above that ashen plain and against that violet sky rent by the ragged purple clouds. And though they were ruined by the ages and the cataclysm, their height was still awesome."

    The NYT review also claims that Sábato has it in for Borges. I don't think that's the case; I think he actually owes a slight debt to the writer. While his characters offer a range of comment on Borges's work (and the word offered last on the topic is a pretty strong dis), this novel doesn't necessarily read as the work of an anti-Borges. On the other hand, the presentation reminds me most of how Bolaño presents Paz in "The Savage Detectives..." which is not entirely unfriendly, but certainly if you had to choose one...

    Sábato is still alive -- at 99.

  8. says:

    ESTE ES UNO DE LOS MEJORES LIBROS QUE HE LEIDO Y ES LA PRIMER OBRA DE SABATO QUE LEO. EL ESTILO ES MUY DIFERENTE EN UNA MANERA POSITIVA A OTROS AUTORES DEL "BOOM" LATINOAMERICANO.

    EL LIBRO DURANTE LAS DOS PRIMERAS PARTES MANTIENE UNA BUENA TRAMA EN DONDE ALGUNOS DE LOS EPISODIOS MAS MEMORABLES EN MI OPINION SON EL BOMBARDEO DE BUENOS AIRES EN EL INTENTO DE GOLPE DE ESTADO EN CONTRA DE PERÓN EN LA DECADA DE 1950. EN ESTE EPISODIO SABATO ES CAPAZ DE COMENZAR A CREAR UNA ATMÓSFERA DE OSCURIDAD Y DE CELEBRACIÓN PAGANA, DONDE LA DESTRUCCIÓN SE APRECIA COMO UNA CARACTERISTICA INHERENTE E INDISOLUBLE DE LA CONDICIÓN HUMANA.

    LAS PRIMERAS DOS PARTES NOS PREPARAN PARA LA SECCIÓN DEL LIBRO QUE LO HACE DESPEGAR COMO UN COHETE Y PODEMOS DISFRUTAR DE LA PIROTECNIA LITERARIA QUE ES EL INFORME SOBRE CIEGOS. EN ESTA PARTE DEL LIBRO ES DONDE REALMENTE UNO COMIENZA A DEVORAR PAGINA TRAS PAGINA EL LIBRO, SOBRE TODO EN LA SUCESIÓN DE EVENTOS QUE SUPONE EL DESCENSO DE FERNANDO VIDAL A LA RED CLOACAL DE BUENOS AIRES.

    EL RETRATO PSICOLOGICO ES UNA DE LAS ESPECIALIDADES DEL AUTOR Y ES UN MAESTRO AL IGUAL QUE DOSTOIEVSKI PARA EXPLORAR LAS ZONAS OSCURAS Y LUMINOSAS DE LOS SISTEMAS FAMILIARES Y DE PASO EXPLORAR LA HISTORIA DE UN PAÍS.

  9. says:

    It totally blew me away! One of the finest gems of Latin American literature that should not be missed. An incredible dense and complex masterpiece, it dives without fear into dark and unexplored crevices of the human mind and soul with unbelievable style and intensity. Hats off to Ernesto Sabato!

  10. says:

    Sobre Héroes y Tumbas is the second novel by Ernesto Sabato. It was a good complex read that explores the depth of humanity. The book starts with an announcement that the late Alejandra Vidal Olmos has just shot her father and then burned herself alive, and so, the book is mainly about the lives of these two characters and what led to the afore mentioned situation, though the plot is developed through other characters.

    Before continuing, I must say that the book was divided into four chapters. Each chapter's name has an important meaning, so don't forget them:

    1. El dragón y la princesa (The dragon and the princess)
    2. Los rostros invisibles (The invisible faces)
    3. Informe sobre ciegos (Report on the blind)
    4. Un dios desconocido (An unknown god)

    Martín is the protagonist of parts one and two of the novel. He is a troubled teenager who feels loneliness most of the time. He doesn't feel loved and he's in constant search for himself. In this situation is in which he meets Alejandra, a beautiful and mysterious lady who claims to need him. Thus, Martín is quickly immersed in Alejandra's world, and thus, he falls in love with her, which only causes more loneliness inside him, since Alejandra is very reserved and can be cruel at times, because of the things she faced in her past.

    And let's don't forget about part three of the book, the Report on the blind. That one was simply astounding. It could almost feel as fantasy. In this part, for those who haven't read this book, Alejandra's father (Fernando) is the narrator. He is obsessed with blind people. For him, blind people are the ones who rule society by a supposed sect in which the members are solely blind. From this, we can clearly see that Fernando is a paranoid and very selfish, what we would call “an unlikeable character.”

    Having read both El Túnel and this one, I can say for sure that Sabato was a talented writer. Did you know he was a physicist and he left science to dedicate his entire time in writing? No? Well, now you can go and tell your family and friends this new fact. Of course this was not necessary, but I wanted to mention it. His writing is captivating and beautiful.

    One thing I really liked was that the characters were greatly developed, especially their psychological side, which sometimes is left untouched. This is something that, in both of books I've read by Sabato, is well done.

    The novel's title was perhaps what initially brought my attention to it. I won't say anything concerning this matter besides that it is powerful. Consider it: Sobre héroes y tumbas. In English, On Heroes and Tombs. Heroes... tombs... Throughout the novel I wanted to understand the meaning of its title, and now, I finally do. And it does justice to it. You'd better read it to get what I mean...

    What else can I say besides what I've already said? Well, for one, I will most certainly read the last one of Sabato's novels. And then, I recommend you to read this book. It is complex, but it is intriguing and is well written. I'll probably re-read this eventually, just to make sure I understood it completely. Not that re-reading it is something bad. No. I will gladly read it a hundred times.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *